Bill C-1

An Act respecting the administration of oaths of office

This bill was tabled by Stephen Harper on May 27, 2010.

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How does a bill become a law?

Don’t trust Schoolhouse Rock – that’s for Americans. To become a law, a bill in the Canada’s Parliament needs to go through the following steps, and pass when voted on during each step:

  • It all starts with the first reading, when the bill is introduced.
  • Next comes the second reading, when other MPs or Senators get to debate the bill.
  • After that, the bill goes to a committee that studies and amends it line-by-line. Once they finish, the bill goes returns to the House or Senate for the report stage, where anyone can propose amendments.
  • The third reading is the moment of truth: no more changes, just a debate and a final vote on whether or not the bill should pass.
  • If a bill makes it through all of those steps – in both the House of Commons and Senate – it’s ready to get Royal Assent and become a law.

Status of this Bill

Introduction and First Reading

Activity Feed

  • Photo of Gary Schellenberger

    This is in response. This is the final reading of the bill. The bill has been debated in the House. There have been questions asked in the House. There have been answers given. ... more

    March 7, 2011,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rob Nicholson
    Rob Nicholson spoke about Government Orders > Citizen's Arrest and Self-defence Act

    moved that Bill C-60, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (citizen's arrest and the defences of property and persons), be read the second time and referred to a committee. ... more

    March 4, 2011,   Parliament
  • Ms. Carole Morency spoke

    Is it possible for a judge to simply adopt the wording of the condition? It is possible, but the condition as proposed by Bill C-54 also says “in accordance with conditions set by the court”. So number one, it's built into the condition. ... more

    Feb. 28, 2011,   Parliament
  • Photo of Vic Toews
    Vic Toews spoke

    Well, I think it is very important, because I believe white-collar criminals are deterred, to a very great extent, by heavy sentences. Many of these individuals are well educated and sophisticated, and they play the odds on this. And if the odds are that you're going to get a year or two in prison for stealing $100 million, if you could get away with a good chunk of that, isn't it worth playing the odds? ... more

    Feb. 17, 2011,   Parliament
  • Mr. Andrew Griffith spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you for the invitation to appear before you today. ... more

    Dec. 8, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Stephen Woodworth

    Thank you. ... more

    Dec. 6, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. Joseph Groia (Lawyer, Groia & Company, As an Individual) spoke

    Thank you. ... more

    Nov. 25, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kelly Block
    Kelly Block spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Nov. 25, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. David Plunkett (Chief Trade Negotiator, Bilateral and Regional, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade) spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair, for the opportunity to appear again before this committee to speak to Bill C-46, an act to implement the Canada-Panama free trade agreement and parallel agreements on labour and the environment. ... more

    Nov. 3, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Brent Rathgeber

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 19, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. Carl Cotton spoke

    No. That would be a new requirement for electricity and gas. ... more

    Oct. 19, 2010,   Parliament
  • Ms. Ruth Gagnon spoke

    I agree, Madam Chair. ... more

    Oct. 19, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Larry Miller
    Larry Miller spoke

    There's just one thing, and the clerk isn't aware of this either. I was just approached the other day by some representatives of the slaughter industry. They have put out an invitation for the committee at some point to go to a plant and concentrate on the dentition or the mouthing of cattle 20 months old and younger in the slaughter industry. There are some issues out there, which I won't go into detail on here, but just discussing them with one gentleman I learned quite a bit more myself. So I put that out there for your information. That might be something we could do down the road. ... more

    Sept. 30, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. Paul Szabo (Mississauga South, Lib.) spoke about Private Members' Business > Criminal Code

    Mr. Speaker, the member is quite right. She has well expressed what the bill is. Members and the public should know that this particular bill occupies about 10 sentences in total, as an amendment to the Criminal Code. Bills S-205, S-206, S-210, and S-215 were iterations of this same bill, the same debate that has come time and again. It is as a result of things like prorogation. The member knows that the last time we did this, we all agreed that this was an important bill. The senator was sitting in the gallery. He was retiring and we wanted to get it through the House so that it could get royal assent and be proclaimed. ... more

    Sept. 21, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kelly Block
    Kelly Block spoke about Private Members' Business > Criminal Code

    moved that Bill S-215, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (suicide bombings), be read the second time and referred to a committee. ... more

    Sept. 21, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. François Lamoureux (Assistant to the Executive Committee, Confédération des syndicats nationaux (CSN)) spoke

    Good afternoon to everyone. First, I would like to thank committee members for inviting us and hearing our views on Bill C-308, which was sponsored by the member of Parliament Yves Lessard. ... more

    March 17, 2010,   Parliament
  • Mr. Michael Ignatieff (Leader of the Opposition, Lib.) spoke about OATHS OF OFFICE

    Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order relating to Bill C-1, which has just been introduced in the House. By dealing with this bill as the first order of business, the House is affirming an important principle. ... more

    March 3, 2010,   Parliament
  • Photo of Stephen Harper
    Stephen Harper spoke about OATHS OF OFFICE

    moved for leave to introduce Bill C-1, An Act respecting the Administration of Oaths of Office, and sought the unanimous consent of the House to have the bill printed.

    March 3, 2010,   Parliament