Bill C-21

Political Loans Accountability Act

An Act to amend the Canada Elections Act (accountability with respect to political loans)

This bill was tabled by Tim Uppal on Nov. 3, 2011.

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How does a bill become a law?

Don’t trust Schoolhouse Rock – that’s for Americans. To become a law, a bill in the Canada’s Parliament needs to go through the following steps, and pass when voted on during each step:

  • It all starts with the first reading, when the bill is introduced.
  • Next comes the second reading, when other MPs or Senators get to debate the bill.
  • After that, the bill goes to a committee that studies and amends it line-by-line. Once they finish, the bill goes returns to the House or Senate for the report stage, where anyone can propose amendments.
  • The third reading is the moment of truth: no more changes, just a debate and a final vote on whether or not the bill should pass.
  • If a bill makes it through all of those steps – in both the House of Commons and Senate – it’s ready to get Royal Assent and become a law.

Status of this Bill

Second Reading and Referral to Committee

Activity Feed

  • Photo of Peter Van Loan
    Peter Van Loan spoke about Oral Questions > Business of the House

    Mr. Speaker, this afternoon we will continue the debate on today’s opposition motion from the NDP. Pursuant to the rules of the House, time is allocated and there will be a vote after the two-day debate. ... more

    May 9, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    Be careful what you joke about, Mr. Kingsley. That might appear as an endorsement in literature down the road. ... more

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    Mr. Mayrand also spoke to us, Mr. Kingsley, on two points. He suggested that we need to have a provision to make sure that no indirect loans could take place. I know that your system might make that less of an issue. I'm assuming that if we kept the system and tinkered with whatever in Bill C-21, you would say as well that we should add a prohibition on that.

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    Thank you. ... more

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Jean-Pierre Kingsley (Former Chief Electoral Officer, As an Individual) spoke

    Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. ... more

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Folks, I will get us to start back in, please. ... more

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Alexandrine Latendresse

    Thank you very much, we appreciate that. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Anthony Polci spoke

    A more general statement in response—I would say banks take their responsibilities quite seriously. How banks conduct themselves in political financing, whether it's under the regime proposed in Bill C-21 or in provincial financing regimes, is ultimately a bank decision, an individual institution decision. We have a competitive marketplace. They are competitors with one another. They will take a number of factors into consideration in their approach. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    Thank you both for being here. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Anthony Polci spoke

    At the end of the day, the bank is not lending to the individual, so the personal credit history is not the relevant feature; it's their ability to have a campaign that is, as I said, a viable campaign. You're not collecting from the individual; you're collecting from the campaign in terms of repayment of the loan. It is that entity that matters. You have to assess, can they fundraise? Is the rebate part of the equation? ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Anthony Polci spoke

    The industry doesn't have a position on the bill for or against it. We haven't come at it from that angle, and banks operate within the laws of Canada. As Mr. Wrobel noted, banks are federally regulated, so we're used to that sort of oversight. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marion Wrobel (Vice-President, Policy and Operations, Canadian Bankers Association) spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. My name is Marion Wrobel and I'm the vice-president of policy and operations at the Canadian Bankers Association. I'm joined by my colleague, Anthony Polci, the CBA's vice-president of government relations. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Good morning, all. Thank you for attending committee this morning. It's great to have you here. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    Currently, there's no restriction, so we have to look at it in the context of Bill C-21. Again, my suggestion is based on the fact that.... ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    It varies by political entities. Of the two entities we have spoken most about today, for candidates in an election, 50% of the loans are from the candidates themselves, and another 30% are from other individuals. In leadership contests, which have been an issue of much discussion, leadership contestants are again depending on individual or other entity loans to the tune.... Again it varies very much, because there are far fewer contests, but it's somewhere around one-third of their funding that is through loans. Of this, a third is from individuals or corporations. Put the private loans aside—those covered by Bill C-21.

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    Well, for unpaid loans there is probably something I could share with the committee, if there is interest. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    With that in mind—because I imagine this is, particularly on the 2006 leadership contest by the Liberals, fairly frustrating for you and your office, and has been for a number of years—you made a series of recommendations in your 2010 report. Based on the discussion we've been having here today—and now having had a chance to take a look at Bill C-21 as well, of course—would you feel that you're in a better position to come back to this committee with an updated series of recommendations, including recommendations on the particular point of repayment of leadership contest loans?

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    Until those debts are repaid. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    Again, I would support that. One of the key objectives of the bill is to prevent self-lending, but unfortunately it forgot to deal with self-supply, which also exists in a campaign. It's not rare to see that. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    Exactly. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand spoke

    That's my reading of the legislation after Bill C-21.

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Marc Garneau
    Marc Garneau spoke

    Merci. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    Thank you, Chair, and thank you, Mr. Mayrand, for being here. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Marc Mayrand (Chief Electoral Officer, Elections Canada) spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    I call the meeting to order. We are in public today with our Chief Electoral Officer, Monsieur Mayrand. ... more

    Oct. 23, 2012,   Parliament
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