Bill C-304

An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom)

This bill was tabled by Brian Storseth on Oct. 1, 2011.

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How does a bill become a law?

Don’t trust Schoolhouse Rock – that’s for Americans. To become a law, a bill in the Canada’s Parliament needs to go through the following steps, and pass when voted on during each step:

  • It all starts with the first reading, when the bill is introduced.
  • Next comes the second reading, when other MPs or Senators get to debate the bill.
  • After that, the bill goes to a committee that studies and amends it line-by-line. Once they finish, the bill goes returns to the House or Senate for the report stage, where anyone can propose amendments.
  • The third reading is the moment of truth: no more changes, just a debate and a final vote on whether or not the bill should pass.
  • If a bill makes it through all of those steps – in both the House of Commons and Senate – it’s ready to get Royal Assent and become a law.

Status of this Bill

First Reading

Activity Feed

  • Photo of Randall Garrison
    Randall Garrison spoke about Oral Questions > Justice

    Mr. Speaker, it is the Internet that is quickly becoming a haven for all sorts of anonymous hateful acts. Gay and lesbian teens have been bullied to the point of suicide. Islamophobia and anti-Semitism are rampant online, with neo-Nazi groups continuing to spread hate. In 2010 alone, police reported over 1,400 hate crimes in Canada. Yet, last night's repeal of an important piece of hate crime legislation gives the green light for these intolerant acts to continue. ... more

    June 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin
    Françoise Boivin spoke about Oral Questions > Justice

    Mr. Speaker, there was a rare moment of unity last night on the Conservatives' side. With the support of one Liberal member, they voted to eliminate the sections on hate speech from the Canadian Human Rights Act, confusing the concept of freedom of expression with that of hateful expression. ... more

    June 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Andrew Scheer
    Andrew Scheer spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    Pursuant to an order made on Wednesday, May 30, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion at the third reading stage of Bill C-304 under private members' business.

    June 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    The House resumed from May 30 consideration of the motion that Bill C-304, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom), be read the third time and passed.

    June 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Vote 269
    That the Bill be now read a third time and do pass.
    • In favour 100%
      Conservative
    • Against 100%
      NDP
    • Against 100%
      Bloc
    • Against 97%
      Liberal
    • Against 100%
      Green
    June 6, 2012
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    That actually slides into the next point. ... more

    June 5, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin
    Françoise Boivin spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    Madam Speaker, I am pleased to rise again to speak about Bill C-304, which Kathleen Mahoney, a professor in the Faculty of Law of the University of Calgary and a member of the Royal Society of Canada, called a bill on the freedom of hateful expression. ... more

    May 30, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Irwin Cotler
    Irwin Cotler spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    Madam Speaker, we are here tonight to debate Bill C-304, a bill which, if passed, would repeal section 13 of the Canadian Human Rights Act, thereby eliminating civil remedies for protection against hate speech in this country, particularly as regarding the exploding and assaultive hate speech and incitement on the Internet, of which insufficient reference, understandably given the limitations of time, has been made at these debates. ... more

    May 30, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    Madam Speaker, I am privileged to rise tonight to speak to Bill C-304 which is before us. My main purpose in speaking today is to ask the question of what happens after this bill, if it passes. I suggest we need to indeed fill a gap, not simply with respect to the fact that gender protection will be lost unless something is done in a hurry, but some of the distinct benefits of civil remedies in this area will also go by the board. We cannot simply rely on the Criminal Code. That is my main message. ... more

    May 30, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Brian Storseth
    Brian Storseth spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    moved that Bill C-304, an act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom), be read the third time and passed. ... more

    May 30, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Andrew Scheer
    Andrew Scheer spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    It being 5:30, the House will now proceed to the taking of the deferred recorded division on the motion to concur in Bill C-304 at report stage under private members' business. ... more

    May 9, 2012,   Parliament
  • spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    The House resumed from May 2 consideration of Bill C-304, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom), as reported (with amendment) from the committee, be concurred in.

    May 9, 2012,   Parliament
  • Vote 190
    That Bill C-304, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom), as amended, be concurred in at report stage.
    • In favour 100%
      Conservative
    • Against 100%
      NDP
    • Against 100%
      Bloc
    • Against 97%
      Liberal
    • Against 100%
      Green
    May 9, 2012
  • Photo of Brian Storseth
    Brian Storseth spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act
    May 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • spoke about Private Members' Business > Canadian Human Rights Act

    The House proceeded to the consideration of Bill C-304, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom), as reported (with amendments) from the committee.

    May 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Robert Goguen
    Robert Goguen spoke about Routine Proceedings > Committees of the House > Justice and Human Rights

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the 10th report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human rights regarding Bill C-304, An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act (protecting freedom). ... more

    April 27, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Robert Goguen

    By repealing section 13, and this is the intent of Bill C-304, section 54 becomes somewhat redundant because it deals with the penalties, which some of the witnesses have found somewhat offensive, and the damages that can be assessed. However, section 54 also contains subsection 54(2), which is the provision that ensures that no one who obtains employment or accommodation in good faith can be ordered, dismissed, or evicted in order to remedy a discrimination. In fact, the repealing of section 54 in its complete state is inadvertent, because subsection 54(2) has no link whatsoever to the hate messages in section 13. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie

    Thank you, Mr. Casey. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin

    Yes, please. This is about clause 2. Before we get to a vote, I want to reflect on a few points. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie

    Thank you, Mr. Casey. You were correct that House of Commons Procedure and Practice, second edition, states on page 766 the following: “An amendment to a bill that was referred to a committee after second reading is out of order if it is beyond the scope and principle of the bill.” ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie

    Thank you, Mr. Casey. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. David Matas spoke

    This jurisdiction is a very particular one. It's basically telephone and Internet, because it deals with the federal jurisdiction on the issue. There are other problems with section 13. The hate jurisdiction federally is split up: the CRTC deals with broadcasting, the post office deals with hate by the post, and so on. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. David Matas spoke

    Excuse me, but I will answer you in English. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. David Matas (Senior Legal Counsel, B'nai Brith Canada) spoke

    Thanks. ... more

    April 26, 2012,   Parliament
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