Bill C-31

Protecting Canada's Immigration System Act

An Act to amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Balanced Refugee Reform Act, the Marine Transportation Security Act and the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act

This bill was tabled by Jason Kenney on Feb. 16, 2012.

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How does a bill become a law?

Don’t trust Schoolhouse Rock – that’s for Americans. To become a law, a bill in the Canada’s Parliament needs to go through the following steps, and pass when voted on during each step:

  • It all starts with the first reading, when the bill is introduced.
  • Next comes the second reading, when other MPs or Senators get to debate the bill.
  • After that, the bill goes to a committee that studies and amends it line-by-line. Once they finish, the bill goes returns to the House or Senate for the report stage, where anyone can propose amendments.
  • The third reading is the moment of truth: no more changes, just a debate and a final vote on whether or not the bill should pass.
  • If a bill makes it through all of those steps – in both the House of Commons and Senate – it’s ready to get Royal Assent and become a law.

Status of this Bill

Royal Assent

Activity Feed

  • Photo of Elizabeth May
    Elizabeth May spoke about Routine Proceedings > Points of Order > Standing Committee on Finance

    Mr. Speaker, I am grateful to the hon. House Leader of the Official Oppositionfor raising this point of order yesterday, objecting to the unusual procedures that were accepted within the Standing Committee on Finance, in relation to the clause-by-clause treatment of Bill C-60, the 2013 omnibus budget bill. ... more

    May 30, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen
    Nathan Cullen spoke about Government Orders > Extension of Sitting Hours

    Mr. Speaker, I apologize for interrupting my colleague just at the beginning of his speech on the justification for the motion that he has just presented to the House, but we have a point of order that we need to raise because I think it establishes a couple of important things for you, as Speaker, to determine before we get into the context and the particulars of this motion. ... more

    May 21, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Sadia Groguhé
    Sadia Groguhé spoke about Government Orders > Economic Action Plan 2013 Act, No. 1

    Mr. Speaker, I will take this opportunity to voice my disappointment and opposition with respect to the various measures set out in Bill C-60, an act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on March 21, 2013. ... more

    May 3, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen
    Nathan Cullen spoke about Oral Questions > Business of the House

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to rise to ask the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons the usual Thursday question about what is on the agenda for the rest of this week and for next week. ... more

    April 18, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of David Tilson
    David Tilson spoke

    Your Excellency, thank you very much for your remarks. I think you were here for Bill C-31, and we thank you for that, too. ... more

    March 26, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kevin Lamoureux
    Kevin Lamoureux spoke about Government Orders > Response to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision in R. v. Tse Act

    Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure for me to rise today to say a few words on Bill C-55. ... more

    Feb. 25, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rick Dykstra
    Rick Dykstra spoke about Oral Questions > Citizenship and Immigration

    Mr. Speaker, if we are going to talk about the file in respect to immigration, let us look at Bill C-31 in terms of the refugee reforms in this country, or Bill C-43, the faster removal of foreign criminals act. We can look at the work that has been done within this ministry time and time again to get backlogs down to ensure that those who have high skills and need to work in this country are going to get here on a much faster basis. All of those backlogs are down. We are doing what is right for the Canadian economy in terms of how we are focused on immigration and we are going to continue to do that.

    Feb. 15, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Sadia Groguhé
    Sadia Groguhé spoke about Government Orders > Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act > Report Stage

    Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank you for the time I have been given. ... more

    Jan. 30, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kevin Lamoureux
    Kevin Lamoureux spoke about Government Orders > Faster Removal of Foreign Criminals Act > Bill C-43--Time Allocation Motion

    Mr. Speaker, this debate right now is about process. The government's House leader has failed Canadians in terms of respecting the proper procedures of the House of Commons. Generally speaking, we bring in legislation and allow for a free and open debate of all members of Parliament from all political parties. Time and time again, the government has brought in time allocation to prevent individual members of Parliament from engaging in debate that is critically important to their giving due diligence to the legislation before them, whether Bill C-43, the Canadian Wheat Board, the pooled pension legislation, the gun registry, the back to work legislation, the financial system review act, budget bills, CP, Canada Post, Air Canada, Bill C-31 and the list goes on. ... more

    Jan. 30, 2013,   Parliament
  • Mr. Les Linklater spoke

    The short answer is yes, we have the authority, and we actually have been sharing with Ontario a considerable amount of information around the status of claimants, largely spurred by the Ministry of Community and Social Services, in terms of querying CIC about the status of individuals who are applying for Ontario Works. ... more

    Dec. 3, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Ted Opitz
    Ted Opitz spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Dec. 3, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rathika Sitsabaiesan
    Rathika Sitsabaiesan spoke about Routine Proceedings > Petitions > Citizenship and Immigration

    Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to table petitions with hundreds of signatures from people in my riding of Scarborough—Rouge River who are calling for the repeal of Bill C-31. The petitions are with respect to the fact that Bill C-31 concentrates more power in the hands of the minister by allowing him to name safe countries and restrict refugees from those countries. It also restricts access to humanitarian and compassionate considerations and would arbitrarily designate irregular arrivals and the mandatory incarceration of people who are arbitrarily designated as irregular arrivals. ... more

    Nov. 30, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen
    Nathan Cullen spoke about Oral Questions > Business of the House

    Mr. Speaker, I know you look forward to this with some expectations. ... more

    Nov. 29, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rick Dykstra
    Rick Dykstra spoke

    Thank you very much, Ms. Clarke. ... more

    Nov. 26, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of David Tilson
    David Tilson spoke

    We also have Richard Kurland, who has been here zillions of times. I always enjoy it when he's here. I don't know where he stands on things, but I always enjoy his presentations. It's good to see you, sir. ... more

    Nov. 20, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Roxanne James

    You've mentioned Bill C-31, which has to do with the bogus refugee claimants. We had someone from CBSA here back on February 14, and in terms of removing someone from Canada, he talked about general costs of $1,500 just to remove them—I believe it was $15,000 if you had to have someone escort them out of the country. ... more

    Nov. 19, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Les Linklater spoke

    Well, as I said, in terms of rejected claimants, under the new system that's coming on stream toward the end of the year under Bill C-31, we estimate taxpayer costs at about $29,000 a year for a failed claimant. If we're able to address a number of those issues, particularly from countries that are visa free—Hungary for one, where we do have a large influx or have had a large influx of refugee claimants from a country without a visa—the eTA is another tool to help us manage those pressures as well.

    Nov. 19, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Les Linklater spoke

    We see where other countries are going, particularly the United States, which has had ESTA since 2008, with good success and from which we are learning. A clear example would be issues related to refugee claimants. Under the current system, we estimate the cost to Canadian taxpayers for a rejected claimant runs up to about $50,000 a year with regard to access to social services, welfare, and that sort of thing. With the new system that's coming on board later this year, further to Bill C-31, we would expect those costs to go down, given the shortened period of time that individuals are in Canada, but it's still a significant amount, $29,000 or $30,000 a year. ... more

    Nov. 19, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rathika Sitsabaiesan
    Rathika Sitsabaiesan spoke about Routine Proceedings > Petitions > Citizenship and Immigration

    Mr. Speaker, in my second petition, the petitioners call upon the Government of Canada to repeal Bill C-31, which they call the punishing refugees act, and return to the framework of the Balanced Refugee Reform Act, passed with the support of all parties in the previous Parliament, as the current bill, Bill C-31, concentrates way too much power in the hands of one minister.

    Nov. 8, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Richard Goldman spoke

    Please read very carefully the sections that we cite at footnote 5. She is caught by proposed paragraph 35(1)(a). The proposed subsections that you just mentioned do not apply to proposed paragraph 35(1)(a). She cannot ask for ministerial relief. Persons who are excluded from protection under article 1F(a) of the convention and therefore inadmissible on proposed paragraph 35(1)(a) have never been able to apply for ministerial relief. They have been able to apply for permanent residency on humanitarian grounds. Bill C-43, under clauses 8 and 9, is taking that away. We didn't talk about it under Bill C-31. Bill C-31 didn't take it away. Bill C-43 is proposing to take it away. ... more

    Nov. 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rick Dykstra
    Rick Dykstra spoke

    You're making my argument for me. She actually, then, has the opportunity under Bill C-31 to apply for H and C—

    Nov. 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Richard Goldman spoke

    She does. This legislation does many things. ... more

    Nov. 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rick Dykstra
    Rick Dykstra spoke

    I'm intrigued by your example. I suppose we're all using them to make our points here on the bill, and I appreciate that. I think all of us have the ability to do that and should be allowed to use examples to explain what we're talking about. ... more

    Nov. 7, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Jean Rousseau
    Jean Rousseau spoke about Routine Proceedings > Petitions > Citizenship and Immigration

    Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to present a petition on behalf of voters to rescind Bill C-31, which, as we know, will restrict immigrants' rights and refugee claims and will give more and more arbitrary powers to the minister responsible.

    Nov. 6, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Rathika Sitsabaiesan
    Rathika Sitsabaiesan spoke about Routine Proceedings > Petitions > Citizenship and Immigration

    Mr. Speaker, I also have another petition signed by hundreds of people who live in my riding of Scarborough—Rouge River and who are calling for the repeal of Bill C-31, which they are calling “the punishing refugees act”. ... more

    Nov. 6, 2012,   Parliament
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