Bill C-36

Protecting Canada's Seniors Act

An Act to amend the Criminal Code (elder abuse)

This bill was tabled by Rob Nicholson on March 15, 2012.

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How does a bill become a law?

Don’t trust Schoolhouse Rock – that’s for Americans. To become a law, a bill in the Canada’s Parliament needs to go through the following steps, and pass when voted on during each step:

  • It all starts with the first reading, when the bill is introduced.
  • Next comes the second reading, when other MPs or Senators get to debate the bill.
  • After that, the bill goes to a committee that studies and amends it line-by-line. Once they finish, the bill goes returns to the House or Senate for the report stage, where anyone can propose amendments.
  • The third reading is the moment of truth: no more changes, just a debate and a final vote on whether or not the bill should pass.
  • If a bill makes it through all of those steps – in both the House of Commons and Senate – it’s ready to get Royal Assent and become a law.

Status of this Bill

First Reading

Activity Feed

  • Vote 491
    That the Bill be now read a third time and do pass.
    • In favour 100%
      Conservative
    • In favour 100%
      NDP
    • In favour 100%
      Bloc
    • In favour 100%
      Liberal
    • In favour 100%
      Green
    Nov. 6, 2012
  • spoke about Government Orders > Protecting Canada's Seniors Act

    The House proceeded to the consideration of Bill C-36, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (elder abuse), as reported (with amendment) from the committee.

    Nov. 5, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Peter Van Loan
    Peter Van Loan spoke about Oral Questions > Business of the House

    Mr. Speaker, while I do not know anything about a so-called deal that the NDP House leader talked about, I do know the Conservative Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance announced a process she was going to recommend to the finance committee to allow study of the bill, which I understand was adopted yesterday. It is a large bill, but it is not as large, of course, as the one that the Leader of the Opposition had when he was part of the cabinet in Quebec. ... more

    Nov. 1, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Matthew Kellway
    Matthew Kellway spoke about Government Orders > Combating Terrorism Act

    Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague from Gatineau for her leadership and wisdom on this particular issue. ... more

    Oct. 22, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Matthew Kellway
    Matthew Kellway spoke about Government Orders > Combating Terrorism Act

    Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to stand today in the House to speak against Bill S-7, An Act to amend the Criminal Code, the Canada Evidence Act and the Security of Information Act. The genealogy of Bill S-7 takes us back to Bill C-36, the Anti-terrorism Act, which was tabled by the Liberal government in 2001. The original intent of the Anti-terrorism Act was to provide the Canadian legislative response to the events of September 11, 2001, 9/11 as we now know it. ... more

    Oct. 22, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie
    Dave MacKenzie spoke about Routine Proceedings > Committees of the House > Justice and Human Rights

    Mr.Speaker, I have the honour to present, in both official languages, the 13th report of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights in relation to Bill C-36, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (elder abuse). ... more

    Oct. 22, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kerry-Lynne Findlay

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin

    I appreciate my colleague's comments. You should never feel badly about not being a lawyer. Lawyers are not the possessors of the absolute truth. If you have three lawyers in a room, you may end up with three different interpretations. And I'm not trying to insult anyone by saying this. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Ryan Leef
    Ryan Leef spoke

    Thank you. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Kerry-Lynne Findlay

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. Thank you for what you've brought out to my colleague, Madame Boivin. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Mr. Matthias Villetorte (Counsel, Criminal Law Policy Section, Department of Justice) spoke

    Good afternoon, everyone. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie

    I call the meeting to order, this being meeting number 45 of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. Pursuant to the order of reference of Wednesday, June 20, 2012, we have Bill C-36, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (elder abuse). Today we're going to deal with clause-by-clause consideration. ... more

    Oct. 18, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Pierre Jacob
    Pierre Jacob spoke

    In addition to passing Bill C-36, should we take any other measures to denounce, prevent and punish elder abuse? Also, should anything be added to Bill C-36 to prevent, denounce and punish elder abuse?

    Oct. 16, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Pierre Jacob
    Pierre Jacob spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 16, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Françoise Boivin

    Thank you very much, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 16, 2012,   Parliament
  • Ms. Josephine Santos (Program Manager, Long-Term Care Best Practices Initiative, Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario) spoke

    Good afternoon. My name is Josephine Santos. I am here today representing the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario, often known as RNAO. I am a registered nurse and the lead manager for RNAO's work on the prevention of elder abuse. Elder abuse has always been a priority for our association, and we appreciate the opportunity to provide feedback to the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights on Bill C-36. ... more

    Oct. 16, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dave MacKenzie

    I call the meeting to order. ... more

    Oct. 16, 2012,   Parliament
  • Ms. Marie Beaulieu spoke

    Mr. Goguen, you are asking what the strength of this bill is and how we can improve it. That reminds me of a principle in law called the Beccaria principle, which says that it is not important how severe the punishment is as long as it is prompt. So it is not about making sure that the sentence is severe, but rather that it is imposed consistently. Perhaps one of the strengths of Bill C-36 is that it reminds us to consider the fact that we are talking about a senior in all cases. In my view, that is a strength. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Pierre Jacob
    Pierre Jacob spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dan Albas
    Dan Albas spoke

    You talked about not just focusing on a top-down but a wider purpose. Could you explain some of the benefits that your community is receiving in regard to the program funding that would complement Bill C-36 and address some of Mr. Cotler's concerns?

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Dan Albas
    Dan Albas spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chair. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe

    Thank you. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Photo of Irwin Cotler
    Irwin Cotler spoke

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
  • Ms. Marie Beaulieu spoke

    Thank you, Ms. Boivin, for your comments, which I sincerely appreciate. ... more

    Oct. 2, 2012,   Parliament
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