Procedure and House Affairs

Committees are how Parliament examines specific issues in depth. They review bills, call expert witnesses, investigate scandals, and report all of this back to the House of Commons or the Senate. You can see this committee's members and recent activity below.

Chair

Vice-Chairs

Members

Activity Feed

  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Great. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen

    I would just express from the official opposition side, as New Democrats, that the urgency of this is very high for us. We'll be endeavouring to act under deadlines for ourselves in terms of witness list submission. I say this through you to the staff. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    You don't like our cozy little rooms. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    It's just a way of saying that there are better rooms than ours.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Some hon. members spoke

    Oh, oh!

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Scott Reid
    Scott Reid spoke

    It's the room with the replicator.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    We'll see if we can get it. Some of these people will not come in person, as we've learned in the past, but—you're right—in our effort to do the best with—

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    Just so everybody knows, that will mean that with prorogation, this is the one committee that continues a certain ghostly existence. We'll have members, but no body, if that's correct. So we can't actually meet if there's prorogation, and that would include the subcommittee. I understand that. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Mr. Scott, I think I saw your hand.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Some hon. members spoke

    Oh, oh!

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • The Clerk of the Committee (Mrs. Marie-France Renaud) spoke

    Once the House has prorogued, PROC still has members, but we don't have a chair; we don't have any studies; we don't have anything, so we cannot meet. Even if we send out a notice of meeting, if there's a prorogation before Friday, it doesn't happen. So it's up to you, until we come back and elect a new chair—or the same chair.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Go ahead.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    I'm just going to ask for some advice from the clerk regarding prorogation. Parliament originally was scheduled to resume September 16, so I assume this coming week the Prime Minister will make some announcement on that. Once that occurs, what is the status of those committees? I'd like some advice from the clerk.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    I'm going to disagree with you, Mr. Cullen. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen

    Specifically then, because I talked about this Friday coming to give committee members and staff five days to gather those kinds of witnesses, my suggestion is that the subcommittee gather on Friday, pull those pieces together, start making those decisions, and outline the plan.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    At some point, once we have gathered some substantial part of witness lists, we'll move forward with a study of the plan, knowing what days we have going forward to look at it. I'm suggesting that we move in our normal fashion. That, I think, would work best.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen

    I totally agree. So amend my thinking, then, to a deadline with the subcommittee setting it up.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Right.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen

    You're saying the agenda should be set by a subcommittee?

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    I'll let you know that in the past and today it's always been your chair's thought to try to pre-think what you might ask and to move forward. We've been doing that. As I said, before we left for the summer we discussed what was in the motion and talked about what could be pre-done or at least looked at. I agree with you 100% on how great the staff is at anticipating our needs and moving forward, but I think without the steering committee actually doing this in the normal way we do it, we will try to do the schedule by whole committee and witness list selection by whole committee. I've seen how that's turned out, and you've been there.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Nathan Cullen

    In that vein and on the orderly fashion, because I agree this thing could get unwieldy if you look at all seven proposals outlined here, what I would suggest to the committee is something specific, Chair, to allow this to be orderly and to allow us also to hit the ground running in whichever fashion, whether it's coming back early, as I've suggested, or not “early”, but starting work when we're meant to, if we follow the parliamentary calendar, or early if the Prime Minister prorogues. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Mr. Cullen.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Craig Scott
    Craig Scott spoke

    If I could, I'll cede this to Mr. Cullen.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Joe Preston
    Joe Preston spoke

    Mr. Scott.

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
  • Photo of Tom Lukiwski
    Tom Lukiwski spoke

    I don't know until we.... I can't answer that, Kevin, because we haven't sat down to try to determine exactly where we want to go with this. Similarly, every time we've tried to set an agenda at this committee, we've handled ourselves in the same fashion. We have a week or whatever it is to come up with witness lists. You will be speaking with your staff, I'm sure, and with other members of your caucus, as will the NDP, as will we. We'll submit the lists, and only at that time will the chair and the clerk then be able to say okay, we have 20, 30, or 40 witnesses. Then they set a work-plan and an agenda based on that. ... more

    Sept. 8, 2013,   Parliament
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